City Chamber Choir aims to revive neglected choral works from past ages, to search out the best in 20th century composition, and to plot musical pathways for the present century.

The choir is led by its hugely experienced founder, Stephen Jones, with guidance from its President, renowned composer Cecilia McDowall, and Patron, Bob Chilcott, and receives infusions of new music from up-and-coming ‘composers in residence.’ Our repertoire encompasses Palestrina, Howells, and popular Christmas carols, but ranges far and wide.

webccc-bridge-2014Formed in 1987 and comprising singers from many walks of life, we meet for rehearsals a stone’s throw from St Paul’s cathedral. Our home, St Anne and St Agnes church, also known as the Voces8 Centre, was designed by Christopher Wren, has been rebuilt many times, and is itself an inspiration. We perform concerts there and in many more of the City of London’s beautiful Wren churches.

We are constantly looking to collaborate with singers, musicians and others from the arts, and regularly travel for concerts and workshops outside the City, beyond London and overseas.

We are always on the look-out for new members to join us on this exciting musical journey!

You can find out more about the choir on the About us page, or better still, come to our next concert.


CCC during lockdown

Like other choirs, because of covid-19, we have been unable to meet in person to rehearse, and sadly we have had to cancel some exciting concerts.

However, CCC is alive and well, and during lockdown we have have been meeting via Zoom to keep our voices in trim (with vocal exercises devised by our indefatigable conductor, Stephen Jones), learn new repertoire, and make some ‘virtual’ recordings. For the latter, we are extremely grateful to second bass and recording whizz William Avery, who has carefully put together all the recordings sent in by individual singers to make a ‘virtual CCC’. Listen to the result on YouTube below.


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